All posts by williamthomson

High time we appraised the YES movement

How the YES movement structures the campaign for independence will be crucially important if we are to secure a victory.

It’s been another important few weeks in the soft campaign for independence. On the 6th of October more people marched for independence than had ever taken to the streets. Over 100,000 marched through Edinburgh “all under one banner”

Just over a week later a major fundraising campaign was launched with a full media blitz. A big promotional push for This Is It included articles in print (and a front page splash) and online by The National, plus supporting blog posts by well known indy campaigners, including senior SNP figures.

It would be easy to look at the YES movement and conclude that all is not just well, but positively rosy. But many in the YES movement have concerns about “our” campaigning as we head into a tumultuous year.

So in this post I want to try to look at a few things in detail.

Firstly, the current set up and approach of “the new SIC”

Secondly,  to look at our big events.

And thirdly is to look at the approach we are taking to funding our campaigns and our movement.

I won’t apologise for the length of this post as I believe these are three exceptionally important areas to cover. (I’ve added a section at the bottom of this post that lists my experience in these areas, lest you think I am spouting nonsense from nowhere)

I hope this piece opens up more conversations on our movement and gives confidence to YESSERS to question the current set up, to suggest alternatives, and to ultimately do something different.

The Scottish Independence Convention’s new fundraising appeal

I’ve been writing for a couple of years about the need for an organisation to co-ordinate the YES movement. So in this initial stance, I am in total agreement with Elaine C Smith and I do agree with her that a majority of the grass roots support the idea –

“I am always asked about a central place/facilitating organisation/resource hub that can distribute and communicate what’s going on to all the other groups……..That’s what we aim to try and provide.” Elaine C Smith.

However I have to question the current approach as outlined by This Is It.  In questioning the set up and structure of the organisation I will reference two similar successful campaigning organisations in Europe.

In the Catalan National Assembly and the Five Star Movement you can see that modern European movements have a centralised body coordinating and resourcing the movement.

However, the phoenix that will rise from the ashes of the SIC, will have several very important differences from both these movements.

The most important difference is that the new SIC, as a  centralised coordinating body, can not represent the YES movement because it is not controlled by the individuals in the movement.

The ANC can and does reflect the Catalan independence movement  because it is “entirely funded by its members: 38,000 “full time” members and over 40,000 “associate members”

So members pay and receive a voice within the organisation. This sounds like an obvious and simple structure for any representative body. Why is the new YES organisation so different?

This representative approach is how political parties, membership bodies, trade unions and trade associations are structured. But this is not how the new SIC is structured. We really have to ask why?

The new organisation will of course have members, but they will not fund the organisation, it will be funded by individuals who will not have a voice or any direct representation.

Members of the as yet untitled YES organisation

This seems a peculiar set up for an organisation and I believe we are right to question the proposed structure, even if its taken two whole years to get to this stage.

There may be a whole host of reasons behind the chosen structure, however, if I was asked to design a organisational structure that was funded but not held to account this is how I would design it. I believe the organisers behind the organisation have a lot of background information to divulge.

The second issue with regard to membership, is to ask why there are so few grass roots organisations supporting it at this stage?

The YES movement has hundreds of groups who support independence yet so few are represented. Isn’t this peculiar?

So YESSERS are asked to fund an organisation that seems to have little support from the heart and soul of the movement, the grass roots organisations.

I find this incredibly worrying. I believe we are in danger of having a (maybe even THE)  leading independence organisation that has little representation from the movement and little if any accountability.

With this structure we are setting ourselves up for all manner of smears from the Unionist media.

Structure, processes and procedures are boring for sure, but they are important. The movement has to stop and think if this is really the way we should be going.

The body that aims to represent the YES moment in various ways should be a membership body with members having control of direction, messaging and operational objectives.

Do we not have the grand designs or ambitions to set up a similar structure as the Italians?

The Five Star Movement has 135,000 members all of whom pay an annual subscription, and if is from here that the movement is funded. Interesting the Movement refused 40.000.000 euros from the state (as a political party that received 25% of the vote ) so determined was it to not be labelled an organisation that could be bought.

There is a minimum subscription and a maximum amount so that no-one can be accused of offering or accepting money in return for influence. Every member has a direct involvement in the organisation. It’s a fascinating structure.

This shows you the extent that the organisation has gone to be  accountable to the movement and to be super clean and above suspicion.

I hope that’s some interesting thoughts on the structure of the organisation and the funding, to help people analyse the new SIC in some more detail. But we have every right to  ask, why THIS structure?

So if that’s how it’s structured and funded, what will it actually do?

Well, similar to the lack of information on membership and representation we are a bit in the dark. Where there is a lack of information people will fill in the gaps.

Perhaps the new organisation will have at its core support for groups that are already doing some great stuff but nowhere is that being made clear.

The only details we have is that they seek £180,000 to fund the organisation for a year. An organisation that will carry out –

Media handling

Strategic support

Resources

Messaging

Administrative capacity

This is all very vague. It leaves open the possibility that the organisation could play drastically different roles. It’s all down to interpretation at this stage.  What does any of this mean? Some details would be very welcome.

If most YESSERS are not going to have direct representation then surely, an absolute bare minimum, should be that they know what they are funding.

In the approach taken so far I believe the organisers have paid a disservice to the 100,000s of independence supporters. There should be much more clarity about the planned role for the organisation BEFORE asking for funding.

And finally I want to look at that annual funding  figure as it hints at the structure and approach of the organisation. In a previous post I said it looked like “an analogue organisation in a digital age”, or all very 2014 as a prominent indy voice put it.

In spending this amount of donated money the organisation will use it to pay full time, permanent staff. They will have office space. They will employ the services of a major brand agency. They will be structured like a traditional campaign organisation would have been in 2014 when we lost.

Five years later the structure hasn’t evolved. They won’t, in short, be using the resources available to them as part of this massive, creative, powerful movement. To give yourself the task of winning independence and not having @zarkwan involved in helping you shape the brand and the messaging, or not having @phantompower14 involved in your digital content creation seems to be totally bizarre.

There are many hundreds, perhaps thousand who could help this organisation, if it was structured differently.

The organisation should be more flexible. It shouldn’t have large fixed costs like five full time staff and premises. It should operate more as a start up or a digital business. It should be super lean and super mean, because it is being funded by donations (more on the issues around funding your organisation by kindness later)

However, IF it was a membership body funded by subscriptions and other income it would then be wise to take on more fixed costs as it would be on a more secure footing. Under this approach £180,000 could be small change.

If one thing is for certain the next independence campaign will need a dynamic and fast footed organisation ready to respond. The set up of the new organisation does little to demonstrate that readiness. It also must have a democratic mandate and be totally transparent.

I think we can do better.

Our large events including Hoop and All Under One Banner

I’ve written in detail about how our independence events can be better. I’ve also noted how impressed I am with the dedication of the volunteers who run these big events.

I’ve been an events organiser for over twenty years and I’ve written as constructively as possible about our events. It is no mean feat to be able to bring thousands of people out on the streets.

I have however lamented that there is no professionalism and no central resource to fund and run these events. To give you some perspective, The ANC spend 300,000 Euro on PR for their large La Diada celebrations! That’s the annual one, that has 1million demonstrators.

The Five Star movement place events at the absolute core of their movement and have done from its inception in 2009.

We should be running 5 star events.

Our current approach to live engagement means we can only but dream of organising events that actually achieve any strategic goals.  If you want to read more about the how our events can be better check out most of the posts on this blog.

It is clear that how we conduct ourselves at our events will have a big impact on how the movement as a whole is regarded by those open to the possibility of voting for independence next time round.

Our events, in all shapes and forms, will have a considerable impact on our campaign and I believe they therefore deserve some more scrutiny.

Jason Micheal’s piece on AUOB shows a willingness to look at the importance of our events and I urge people to read it.

The two issues that I would like to address here are –

The events that represent the entire movement are not co-ordianted by the movement and

There is little accountability or transparency at these events.

I have to make this point clear. I am not for one second saying grass roots organisations should not organise events, exactly the opposite in fact, but I believe they should have some central resource to help them.

However I do believe that large events should be co-ordainted by a central body or a representative body, not by individuals acting for the movement. And I think I’ve been clear, I don’t think it should be structured like the new SIC seems to be.

The reasons for me are clear –

They are too big and too important to leave to volunteers.

They will never have the impact and the support if they are not supported by the whole movement.

They can never stand up to scrutiny and they lack transparency if they are not properly organised.

It is time to ask how we organise the events where we showcase our movement to see if we can do things better.

How we fund our movement or “the curse of the crowd funder”

As we approach the end of the first week of funding for This Is It the fund raiser passed its first target of £30,000 and is now sitting just over £40,000. So according to the website this is enough for –

“30K will get the organisation started and branded – complete with public engagement research (so we know that undecided voters will be open  to what they see when they look at our messages and branding)”

So it looks like its a done deal and the fundraising has done it’s job.

If you want to raise funds for something before you actually have to do much, then crowd funding is the way to go. But to fund an entire movement this way is madness.

We have to find a more secure way to fund the YES movement.

We should not be funding our entire movement on frequent acts of kindness, fundraisers and passing buckets around, well, not if we want to have a successful campaign. We will be in professional campaign mode soon and we have to be professional and that means being secure in our finances.

In Catalonia “paying for things” is part of the independence culture. You pay for membership to have a say in the direction of the movement. An event is run form the money that is raised selling the t-shirts that everyone wears. Campaigns are paid for by the merchandising that is sold.

This is a mature approach to funding a campaign. Again I question why this approach is regarded as “grass roots” in Catalonia and Italy but not in Scotland?

La diada 2018
Miniture ballot boxes are sold to pay for the defence costs of Catalan political prisoners.

If we want to move to a more secure footing for our movement we have to ask some important questions. What does it actually mean to be grass roots? Should volunteers be doing so much? Is it wrong to ask people to pay for things? Who should lead the movement? And what role should we have in the organisations that represent us?

In August I spent a few days in the south of Italy with members of the Five Star Movement. I wanted to get to the heart of the organisation and how it was structured in the hope I would see more options for what we can do in Scotland.

I talked through our peculiar Scottish issues mentioning the role of volunteers and the grass roots approach, “Grass roots are the volunteers right, they are the engine, but every movement needs dedicated professionals to run it, unless, maybe it’s not serious?” said Paolo.

I assured him he would never meet more serious and dedicated people than those in the Scottish grass roots independence movement but he couldn’t take the step to understand why we didn’t want to professionalise or to make regular financial commitments.

He was also confused when I told him that many people who led in 2014  seem poised to lead again. He told me that this would not happen in the Five Star Movement. This is because they believe that no one is irreplaceable and that people should move over after a period of time.

I nodded and said we have a lot to learn.

I hope it is not too late for the movement to look again at its structures.

I’ve been organising events for over twenty years. During that time I’ve set up several departments in large membership organisations. I wrote a book about organisational structures in not for profit organisations. I have also set up and run a couple of small commercial organisations. I currently run Gallus Events Ltd. which manages Europe’s largest blog for Personal Assistants in Europe, several events and does consultancy all over Europe. I ran my crowdfunded event in 2017. 

An alternative to the Scottish Independence Convention

I believe that the YES movement should have an alternative to the Scottish Independence Convention as the “coordinating body” for the YES movement and here’s what I propose. 

Most of the people who will read this post will have never read anything I’ve written before and will certainly never have heard of me. So the first thing to say is that this is not an opportunist post on a “hot topic” I’ve been discussing, agitating and proposing a coordinating YES body for almost two years.  Here’s  few links that cover my thoughts and feelings…..

A post from May this year asking for the movement to come up with an alternative.

How a coordinating body could improve what the grass roots does. March 2018.

How do the Catalans co-ordinate their movement? April 2017.

The second thing to say is that I am delighted that SIC has new proposals. I believe there is an absolute need for an organisation to coordinate the movement, if we have the right one we can secure independence.  But let’s do all we can to make sure it is the right one.

What is the Scottish Independence Convention

“The Scottish Independence Convention is a coalition of Scotland’s national pro-independence organisations, the pro-independence political parties and, through the membership of regional forums, of Scotland’s local grassroots pro-independence groups. It is just about to launch a fundraiser to start a national campaign organisation.”

This was taken from the open letter from SIC to the YES movement. And that movement includes me. So this is, in part, my right of reply. But I will let Mr Malky succinctly reply on my behalf.

Very 2014

Having read the letter in detail I think the SIC are about to create an analogue organisation for a digital age.

By their own admission it’s taken almost two years to come up with the new format. Successful organisations don’t work like this nowadays. And after the two years it looks very much like, well, how the SIC looked before.

I plan to write this response in two parts (the second one to follow will cover my concerns about SIC).

This first part covers the alternative suggestion I have and this is much, much more important. So please do read on.

An alternative to SIC created by the movement

It’s easy, actually all too easy with the invention of Social Media, to criticise the work of SIC to date and its proposals. However, any argument has less credibility when the people who make it have an alternative but do nothing about it.

So I want to suggest a way for “everyone” in the YES movement to get involved in creating an alternative to the SIC proposal. I want to help offer a choice for the YES movement.

I know that everyone involved in SIC wants the best possible organisation to support the movement so I know they will support this idea. I look forward to them all engaging in the spirit of doing what is best for the movement.

OK, so here it is.

I suggest a weekend long event tasked with creating an alternative to the Scottish Independence Convention. 

It would be an open event and anyone keen to support the movement would be able to attend the event. The event would take place from 5pm Friday to Sunday 5pm in a Hackathon style. It would also have online attendees.

If you haven’t attended or heard about a Hackathon you will be amazed at what can be created during this weekend format. I have little doubt that the moment could create an alternative to SIC over the weekend. So how would it work?

As an event organiser (with a considerable number of years experience) I am offering to coordinate, manage and run the IndyHACK.

It’s up to others to decide to get involved, take part and create an alternative to SIC.

To build from the bottom up the organisation that will help co-ordinate Scotland’s independence.

GET IN TOUCH – I am interested please get in touch when you have more concrete details. 

Here’s some more information

What is a Hackathon?

I would propose that we have “teams” who decide to work on the following areas (among others)

A constitution
A committee structure
A board of directors
An overall communications / membership platform
Donations policies
Membership benefits
Subscriptions process
An organisational structure
Job descriptions
A website
Social media channels
Social media guidance
Social media strategy
A logo
Brand and brand guidelines
A name
Health and safety, equal opportunity employment policies, etc.
Ensure GDPR compliance
A database
Premises
Funding and revenue strategy
Contractural arrangements with public relations etc.
Launch strategy
Live engagement strategy
Legal advice
Business set up
Tax position

Two weeks after the event the full details of the proposed organisation would be uploaded online. We would ask SIC to do the same and give as much detail as possible. The “movement” would choose the winning organisation.

Impossible? I doubt it. Able to happen before the end of the year? For sure. Is anyone interested in taking part? I have no idea. Let’s find out.

GET IN TOUCH – I want to get involved. 

La Diada 2018

As one million independence supporting Catalans took to the streets to demand independence during La Diada celebrations, the YES movement spent the day arguing about Braveheart. How can two grass roots movements be so different?

For the seventh year in a row two grass roots organisations the Assemblea Nacional Catalana and Òmnium have organised the largest one day event in Europe. La Diada celebrations took place on the 11th of September and this year attracted around one million supporters.

It was, as always, a fantastically colourful and fun day. It’s a street celebration of Catalonia with Gigantes, Castellers, and La Sardana with the Catalan independence flag La Estelada tied to every conceivable living thing or inanimate object.

La Daida 2018
The amazing Castellers.

As a Scot I have mixed feelings when I take part in this type of event. I am in absolute awe of the achievement of the organisers and the passion of the crowd. But I wish those yellow and red flags were blue and white. It would be spectacular if we could have a national day celebration like this in Scotland but, as everyone will tell you, there are just too many buts…….

La Diada 2018  The Coral Demonstration

The organisers know that they have to keep the event fresh and this year the coral colour of the official teeshirt was chosen to remind everyone of the shocking scenes which took place during the 1st October independence referendum. It was a coral coloured tie that “secured” the ballot boxes.

This year, the route packed in the demonstrators, rather than spreading them out across the city or the country. At 17.14pm a massive wave of sound travelled down the demonstration before toppling over a specially constructed symbolic wall: this movement will overcome any and all barriers.

As ever the central focus was the demand for a Catalan Republic but this year the crowd were given extra voice by the imprisonment or forced exile of the organisers of the 1st Oct referendum.

The objectives of La Diada

La Diada is used to re-energise and to motivate independence supporters in Catalonia and to internationalise the cause. In addition the call for the return of the political prisoners was the main focus for the international aspect of the demonstration in 2018.

Among the speakers three prestigious European personalities took to the stage: Aamer Anwar, the acknowledged Scottish human rights lawyer, in charge of the legal defence of Catalan ex-minister Clara Ponsatí; Thomas Schulze, the German university professor recognised for his staunch defence of the Catalan cause in Europe; and Ben Emmerson, the English international and human rights lawyer in charge of the defence before the United Nations of President Carles Puigdemont and other Catalan politicians.

In 2017 around 800,000 took part in La Diada. It would be hard to argue that an extra 200,000 independence supporters have been found since Spain’s brutal put down of the referendum last October.  The actions of the Spanish Government continue to recruit supporters to the cause of Catalan independence in much the same way as the main Westminster parties approach to Brexit is pushing more people towards support for Scottish independence.

Could Scotland hold a similar event in 2019

The independence movement in Scotland needs an event of this scale and size. In much the same way as the Catalans we have to internationalise our claim for independence.

How many people would remain ignorant of Scotland’s current position as a Nation (and not a region) as well as our vote to remain in the EU after seeing pictures of a massive colourful demonstration stretching from Edinburgh to Arbroath? Or from Edinburgh to Bannockburn?

We all know the answer. Scotland’s natural beauty and our historic landmarks provide a canvas that no main stream media in the world would ignore. Sure, we run our own independence events in Scotland, however, like a tree falling in a wood, an event only has an impact if people actually see it.

Our current demonstrations

Having a few thousand people march through Dumfries or a few thousand watch Braveheart in the centre of Glasgow just doesn’t excite anyone outside of those already committed to voting YES.

We have an exceptionally motivated and committed grass roots movement in Scotland and with a shared focus we could organise an event of this size. We could. And we should.

Scotland needs a body similar to the ANC

To organise an event of this scale we need an organisation similar to the Assemblea Nacional Catalana. We need elected representatives from the movement who appoint and direct full time staff and we need this now.

There’s rumours that the Scottish Independence Convention have announcements forthcoming, which may point towards this type of professional organisation, but I’ve been told something is “imminent” for at least nine months.

As I look over the front pages of all of the Spanish papers this morning to see this amazing stream of people who packed the streets, I am still filled with the possibility that Scotland could do this. And we should.

La Daida Grassroots events

If you are involved in a grass roots organisations, perhaps one that is currently discussing the structure of the SIC, and you don’t see the need for a body to help coordinate the movement then come and experience La Diada.

If you are one of the organisers of Hope Over Fear or All Under One Banner and you want your efforts to really, truly make a difference, then pull your resources and get behind one massive national day demonstration. There’s a million reasons to do it.

The impact of the events industry on your doorstep – Edinburgh Festival 2018

There are many different things you are taught as an event organiser, but one ever present is that “big is beautiful” There’s scarcely an events organiser who doesn’t want their small event to grow to epic proportions.

However the size of the Edinburgh International Festival and the Edinburgh Festival Fringe is calling into question its actual “success”

The size of the Edinburgh Festival

Every year Edinburgh, a tiny wee city in a tiny wee country, is the destination for the “World’s largest international arts festival” This is really extraordinary and is something that should make every Scot mightily proud. It’s not just any country that can host a festival of this importance.

Scotland’s capital is only able to host an event of this size because our outstanding artists of today stand on the shoulders of giants.  Would we have Rankin, Welsh or McDermid without Burns, Scott and Spark? Would we have the right to host a cultural festival of this size without artists of this magnitude? But it’s not just our cultural heritage.

The supporting infrastructure filled with skilled and knowledgeable event professionals, audio and visual suppliers, stage set builders, etc. allow this festival to flourish. Without the events industry there is no festival. We build the stage on one of the world’s best backdrops.

A breathtakingly stunning city places Edinburgh apart from many other “wanna be” international art festivals. People visit for the events but……what a stage Edinburgh makes. However, increasingly, year on year, that stage seems to be creaking.

edinburgh international festival complaints

After over seventy years the Edinburgh Festival and the Fringe are now woven into the cultural tapestry of Scotland. Its success is our success. However, alongside the plaudits there is failure. The locals are restless.

“If these criticisms aren’t addressed they will mount and the festival will become confirmed as an event that is wholly imported and subjected on people, rather than in any sense hosted” – Mike Small Editor of Bella Caledonia.

As an event organiser who has been involved in organising large international events, I find it hard to argue against any of the 10 points in this Bella Caledonia article. It is thoughtful, deliberate and suggests discussion. It is not laced with rage, as Joyce McMillan suggested in a piece in the Scotsman.

The Perfect Stage

During the 1990s I had occasional trips to Edinburgh and I remember the Festival much like the Hogmanay festivities. They were very manageable for attendees and organisers. International visitors made up a small percentage of the crowd and it was pretty easy to experience Edinburgh, while these events were on, without crashing into either of them. How things have changed.

Both these events are huge, and both not without controversy, especially around working conditions for staff and the use or mis-use of volunteers (as a Living Wage Employer I make my view very clear here); so size brings its own complications. But still we event organisers crave growth.

The Event Organisers’ role

Like every other industry the events industry, in general, strongly believes that big is beautiful. We are a capitalist industry like every other, constantly living with the fear that we have to grow or die.

This leads to ignorance. Like most business people we aren’t trained, educated or in many cases aware that there is a negative impact from the work we do. But for event organisers it’s even more difficult than most for us not to bask in our God like status. Maybe you don’t want a big event in your backyard, but sure as anything your country and your city does!

The ever popular event industry

In many cases – and yes this is true – countries, regions and cities will pay the event organiser of a profitable show a trunk load of money to bring an event to your doorstep. Valencia submitted a bid of €170m to host the Web Summit, so it is no surprise that complaints from locals often meet with the response: “other cities would DIE to be as lucky as you”

We have people volunteering to work for us. They don’t want to be paid, they just want to be able to attend our events for free.

Even when an event makes millions of pounds profit, organisers can still get the Government to pay them to relocate their hugely profitable event.

See, everyone loves us, so should we care about a few locals?

It is with this attitude that many organisers and promoters will view the grievances of some noisy locals. And it’s not just the organisers and promoters who run events during the festival and the fringe, it is an industry wide approach. You can find the same view in any major city in the world.

In Barcelona the city struggles to cope with Europe’s largest tech event Mobile World Congress, but even the socialist mayor was keen to persuade the event to stay.

As an industry we have to first understand the negative impacts we can make and then secondly we have to act.

A call for dialogue

There are genuine concerns in Edinburgh over the size, scale and type of events that Edinburgh now holds. The event industry has to be aware of the negative impacts, and then be involved in solving the problems.

Last year within the ‘Skills needed for organising an event’ blog post on my Gallus Events website I highlighted that “more event planners should be, at least aware, of the “impact”, both positive and negative of our events” but you will struggle to see other event industry types even mention these issues. Many of the Event Associations have a habit of burying their head in the sand. 

It is here that Event Scotland, whose tagline is: Scotland The Perfect Stage, should take some credit.

As part of Visit Scotland, Event Scotland are tasked with increasing tourism to Scotland. They of course actively promote and support the large Edinburgh events but they have a regional focus, offering incentives to launch events outside of Edinburgh and Glasgow.

Scotland needs events to bolster the exceptionally important tourist industry but events have to add value to their locality.

Many event organisers carry out their work in a diligent and meaningful manner, just trying to make a living, like everyone else. I believe for most organisers the issues are around awareness and education, rather than a hell for leather, damn them all approach.

Event organisers and promoters should work with Government agencies, local authorities and local communities to ensure their events are welcome and they must place profit alongside their social and community responsibilities.

I believe the event industry is ready to talk, I just hope it is ready to listen.

Pointless protests and point scoring

There’s no point organising an event if you don’t set objectives. And of course you have to have the right objectives. Often this basic element of any event is missing from the YES movement’s events. 

Saturday’s protest outside BBC HQ attracted around 250 people and saw considerable support on social media – in part down to the ever present Independence Live. But what was the point? Or in event talk, what was the objective of the protest?

BBC Bias Protest at Pacific Quay

It’s no small effort to coordinate a demonstration of this size.  Even as the team behind All Under One Banner (who coordinate some huge and important rallies) cut their event teeth, it’s still a challenge.  I’ve managed over 700 events, so I know organising and attending every event is time you could be spent doing something else!

However if you are going to run an event, the first and most important part is to set and understand the reasons to run the event. I wrote a piece for CommonSpace last year highlighting the importance of this central aspect of an event and as far as the AUOB events play out, it seems to have gone unnoticed.

The first thing to say about the protest at Pacific Quay is that I would have not advised running it at all. However, doing the planning process one objective should have been penned and communicated to all:

“This protest is being organised not against the employees but against the editorial decisions that appear to be strongly biased in favour of Scotland’s place in the Union and also editorial decisions which seen to “do down” Scotland at every turn. We are seeking a meeting with senior representatives of the BBC to express the views of a large number of Scots” 

You have to set an objective this this, otherwise what’s the point?

A pointless protest

Why have people standing outside to listen to a few speeches and wave a few flags unless something meaningful is to come out of it?

Why run an event, if all you are going to do is score a spectacular own goal?

Why look a PR gift horse in the mouth?

The answer is simple: because the event didn’t have the right objectives.

Look again at the objective I suggest and walk through the two possible scenarios:

1. BBC meet representatives from protest against BBC Bias.

Or

2. BBC refuse to meet representatives from protest against BBC Bias. Where’s the PR downside there? It’s a win/win for the movement.

But without objectives we have this:

“We offered the leaders of the protest the opportunity to come in to the building to enter into dialogue with senior managers at BBC Scotland but they declined the offer.”

Made even worse by this:

“I was the person asked and I declined. We don’t want to enter into a dialogue with the BBC to try to repair things…. Do any of you see any buttons up the back of my head? No! We want to see the end of the BBC in Scotland. I hope I made that clear.”

Quotes from the Scotsman

So we have a pointless process and some petty point scoring, which all leads to an own goal for the movement. And I am sure that was not the objective.

A hard Brexit will not be hard for everyone

There isn’t now a scenario where the short to medium term health of the UK economy improves. The lead up to a hard Brexit has already done its damage to a fragile British Economy.

Even the softest Brexit (remaining in the customs union) according to the UK Government’s own figures, and backed up by the first macro analysis of Brexit which was carried out by the Scottish Government, confirms a dire situation. And of course we are heading for a much harder Brexit.

Let’s get one thing clear: a hard Brexit will not be hard for everyone. After the 2008 financial crisis which started the wave of “austerity” across Europe, the wealth of the top 1% has been on an upward trajectory ever since.  With wage growth pretty much stagnant, it is the earnings from assets (the top 10% own almost half of UK wealth) that set this group apart.

As some do better when most do worse, it is clear that for the last ten years we have not in fact, “all been in this together”

A hard Brexit will not be hard for everyone

Most Economists suggest that the Brexit which is likely to play out will be considerably worse than the crash in 2008. Of course the pain will be felt by some, while others will be shielded by their wealth.

This disparity of pain will be obvious to most UK citizens. They will see inflation rise and wages, at best, remain moribund. Not only will the cost of living rise but the quality of life will deteriorate. Things that seemed easy to do, like trips to Europe and common like eating Iberian Ham, will be truly foreign.

Already sparse shelves will empty quickly. Run down roads will worsen. Teachers will be more stressed. Across the whole of society the fabric that holds us together will strain. And this will all exist in the same world where the stock market stays buoyant, executive bonuses stay high and international companies use the falling pound to buy back shares to increase shareholder payouts.

FTSE 100 Brexit
A steady growth that sees those who earn from investments continue to do well.

So how will society function with such obvious levels of disparity and despair? It is simple. We will blame other people and then we will blame ourselves. This is the natural progression of a society irrevocable damaged.

A ‘no deal’ or an exceptionally hard Brexit will lead to a nationwide overdose of Europhobia. The main stream media, with the few exceptions which prove the rule, will be baying for European blood. This kamikaze approach by the Tory Government can only work with the complicit support of the foreign based media owners and their lackeys at the BBC. The song sheet is already being rehearsed.

It will read like a racist playlist:

“We will be in this state because of the unreasonableness of the EU”.

“The Irish, the Irish, our supposed friends have been the worse. Those thick Irish.”

“The Germans have been waiting 70 years to get back at us”

“Isn’t it time to send those Poles back?”

I shudder to think of the racist riffs and bigoted melodies that will be played by The Mail and The Express.

Open veins of the U.K

In those long sought after trade deals we will find new enemies. The reality of international trade will all too quickly play out. When two Nations play this game the larger holds all the cards. The UK will be dwarfed by scores of Countries as it seeks an impossible “level playing field”: in international trade it does not and has not ever existed.

The UK will find the conditions will be like the ones they set for South American countries in the nineteen century when Great Britain blockaded their ports, banned domestic production and flooded their markets with cheap produce then, of course, racketed up the price.

It will be pay back time for Nations across the globe. The “Open Veins of Great Britain” will give the xenophobes new life, especially when former colonies truly rebel, “The Indians, the Indians, our supposed friends have been the worse”

But of course the blaming of others can only last for so long. Soon enough we will run out of headlines and Nations to attack.

It will become harder to blame others, so we will naturally and easily blame ourselves. Like a recalcitrant skelf our anger will sit just under our skin and we will scratch and scratch until we bleed.

A new double album of material will be released by the UK Government and welcomed by their super fans in the Great British Press. We Brits Are A Lazy Bunch will be accompanied by Our Economy Needs Modernising.

The scene has been set with the ever increasing focus on “Productivity” over the last few years. The UK economy is the least productive in the G7 countries (by a big margin) and it has nothing to do with laziness.

So it’s easy to find alternative facts to evidence that this is down to the lazy Brits attitude and application to work rather than the short term nature of investment and the sucking of profits offshore. “If you want things to improve you have to work harder AND longer” will underpin the discussions on the UK’s productivity.

In a worsening economy it’s not a large leap for this to take a much darker turn, “Maybe YOU are working hard, but the person next to you isn’t” With that, the societal descent will be almost complete.

Disaster Capitalism

The final piece of the absurd national catharsis will be to blame our institutions. Modernisation will be super changed as a sense of national panic, built by the Government and willingly supported by the media, will take the sacred cows into the slaughter house.

With trade deals will come the opening up of the entire British state. Liam Fox and his bunch of buccaneers will be courting American multi nationals to run every facet of the UK economy. The 1% will see wonderful new investment opportunities and will be in on the ground floor.

The USA is the promised land for these charlatans. They look on the shallowness of the state and go misty eyed. They see the state retreat from every aspect of life and mirror in that a dreamscape for the UK.

In a short few years after a hard Brexit the neoliberal ideal will be realised in Great Britain. Disaster capitalism will rule.

The state will shrink. The common wealth will be in private hands. Taxation will be low.

America will finally have its GREAT 51st state. And most of us will have nothing at all.

Plans for La Diada 2018 unveiled evoking the 1st October Referendum

The 11th of September is a holiday in Catalonia for the national day: La Diada. Plans for La Diada 2018 were announced in July.

The focal point of the celebration is always the huge rally organised by the ANC and Omnium, the two largest grass roots organisations that directly support a Catalan Republic.

Plans for La Diada 2018 unveiled

The celebration is different every year in theme and often location. This year the celebration will take place along a 6KM section of one of Barcelona’s main streets.  La Avenida Diagonal, a road that pretty much splits the city in two, will be crammed with those in support of a Catalan Republic.

la diada 2018
The demonstration will pack Diagonal a 6KM stretch of the major Barcelona street.

It’s likely that around 1 million people will take part, at what is now, the largest annual single day event in Europe.

A colourful demonstration

As well as a different theme and location there is normally a different colour. This year the colour is Coral, to reflect the ties that secured the ballot boxes during the 1st October Catalan Referendum.

La diada 2018

The vast majority of supporters will wear the official La Diada 2018 luminous coral t-shirt. A helicopter will fly the route, taking pictures that will be beamed across the globe. The global press interest will be as high as ever. Front page covers and news bulletins across the world will show images of a million defiant Catalans demanding the right to self govern.

Millions of supporters of the idea of a Catalan Republic will have an amazing day. They will see that their dream is shared by a huge number of Catalans. The event is both a strategic and tactical masterpiece.

The location for La Diada 2018  is well chosen

Many of Barcelona’s most famous monuments and buildings sit close to Diagonal. From Barcelona’s Nou Camp stadium at one end to Gaudi’s La Sagrada Familia at the other, Barcelona’s brightest and best cultural building will come into sharp focus. The pictures remind the world of the immense wealth of Catalan culture.

The colour has been chosen to evoke memories of the 1st October Referendum

La Diada 2018 will remind the world when Catalans had to “brave” the line that snaked outside 100s of polling stations as they waited to cast a vote.  It’s like re-running the referendum without the potential for voters being bloodied by Spanish police.

The organisers know that to engage at a regional, national and global level they have to alter the backdrop of the event to avoid apathy setting in (a situation that every annual event has to face): even Europe’s largest annual event can lose it’s appeal.

The Organisers

The event is coordinated, funded and organised by the professionals employed by Omnium and the ANC. As of course it has to be. As an event organiser it would be unimaginable to think of an event like this funded and organisation by part time independence supporters. The stress and the stain would be unbearable, so to would the administrative and logistical burden. The event is a huge undertaking, involves months of organising and costs in excess of 600,000 Euro*

Sure a happy bunch of grass roots enthusiasts could run an annual event, but just imagine the difference? The event would shrink, press would not be invited, managed or housed, helicopters would be replaced by cameras on top of buildings, the PA replaced by a loud hailer. It would be so unthinkable for a Catalan independence supporter than they would laugh at the suggestion: having the most important day in the Catalan Independence calendar run by part timers! Are you mad?

No, the Catalans are not mad. But the Scots are. Amateurism rules, and our independence events make a tiny ripple on the smallest of ponds.

*rough estimate given to me by the Head of Press, ANC, in 2017.

Events in Scotland in reaction to events at westminster

Probably the most seismic political event in Scotland since the referendum result in 2014 took place on Wednesday: the walk out of all 35 SNP MPs in protest at the process laid down for the EU Withdrawal Bill.

One day later between 400 and 500 people demonstrated outside Holyrood in Scotland’s capital. Edinburgh wasn’t alone. Around 100 demonstrators did the same on Wednesday evening in Dundee.

Now you can look at these “events” in one of two ways. The first is how Andy and Fiona felt:

The second is the way that almost everyone else, outside the Independence bubbles on Facebook and Twitter, did: absolute silence or totally ignorance.

Events in Scotland

This was the movement’s immediate physical response to the Westminster power grab from the Holyrood Parliament. Maybe 600 people is a lot. Maybe it’s nothing. But I want to look at Jason’s point:

Just imagine…….

So what if we were to plan a march to London or a human chain across Scotland, who exactly would plan it, market it and organise it?

My day to day life is organising other people’s events or advising them on how to organise their own events. I’ve been doing that for almost 10 years. I’ve been organising events for over 20 years. As you can see from other posts on here I bang on about events quite a bit.

It would be a huge, monumental task to organise a successful event of this scale. Incidentally it has happened in Catalonia in 2013 and very recently in the Basque Region – the link is from CNN: note you won’t see anything about the HOOP rally there.

It would almost definitely be beyond the wonderfully committed volunteers of HOOP and AUOB. It would be almost exclusively advertised through two social media platforms (operating in the Indy bubble) and our other dedicated indy mediums like The National.

The National YES Registry would I am sure use their platform to support: but again this concentrates on the already converted and committed.

The organisers would not have access to the largest email database of independence supporters (held by the SNP) They would have no funds to advertise the event, unlike their Catalan cousins who have 300,000 Euros to advertise their La Diada celebrations. No cash to pay for professional PR. In fact vey little of the things that are needed to make an event like this truly successful. Passion and dedication only gets you so many attendees. 

The Independence movement needs a dedicated, professional organisation to coordinate, support and offer resource to the movement. If one existed, similar to the Catalan National Assembly we would be able to answer Limmy’s Tweet:

We would be able to say. The Scottish National Assembly will be organising a Human Chain across Scotland in August. Images will be shown world wide. It will cut across Edinburgh during the Edinburgh festival, bringing the issue of Scottish independence to a world wide audience in our capital.

We need a body like this. Even if it just organises a few large annual events. We need to, as Limmy says, do “something”

Please drop me a note or comment if you support the idea of an independent body to coordinate the YES movement.

The power of events to the Scottish independence movement

Owing to the success of the AUOB march in Glasgow in May, views on events dominated the YES supporting media and filled Indy blogs for the full week after the event. Every article showing the power of events to the Scottish independence movement.

We all got quite excited about the massive turnout, and it really felt like the movement received a jolt of energy. This shot in the arms was especially noticeable online.

I believe an annual event like this is crucial for the YES movement and I have some thoughts on when that should take place,  which I will save for another post.

However as I argued here, I think the movement should hold back on other marches which have a similar objective of demonstrating the size of the movement. It’s not a good idea to ask people to judge the size of the movement at small events. That’s a risky strategy: one that the movement doesn’t need to take.

As someone who has organised events for over twenty years, I have seen organisers and organisations caught up in a post event high. Almost overnight we have all got very excited about the power of events or as we event professionals like to grandly call it, live engagement and communication.

The power of events to the Scottish independence movement

Ive been writing for a while about events for the YES movement so I am delighted to see more in the movement acknowledge their power. Bringing like minded people together to discuss, plot, challenge, laugh, debate and plan is the fuel for every successful movement: it’s the reason that the right to free assembly is always at the top of the Dictator’s banned list.

We aren’t quite up against a dictatorship but the YES movement certainly has its challenges getting our message out, and this is why our events must not waste the opportunity in front of them.

The AUOB march was of course just one of scores of different YES events that took place in the first half of May. The next major YES event is The Gathering in Stirling on the 27th May and before that loads of other YES events will take place across the country, all doing their bit to build the case for an independent Scotland.

Our movement has to include a huge effort to physically engage the wider electorate, as it’s really the only field of communication where we can play on that level playing field.

How to compete against the Unionist dominated Main Stream Media

The main stream media in Scotland and the UK speaks with an almost universal voice and this brings it a huge amount of power. But thankfully, it’s not just the frequency of a message that has an impact but also the emotional connection, and that’s were events can help level that playing field. Events which are more of an experience have an emotionally bigger and more positive impact than more traditional events.

Our movement has to embrace the march, the demonstration and the conference but it also has to embrace the Hackathon, the online hub summit, the bar camp and the whole host of event formats that are available to organisers within our movement.

If you are thinking about running a YES event please drop me a line to arrange a chat and we can make sure that the format you choose will achieve your objectives. But most importantly keep organising events!