Searching for ScotRefEvents

Let’s start with this scenario. I am a possible “Yes” supporter. I voted “No” in 2014 but my faith in the Union has wavered. I still have my doubts, but I am willing to engage to find out more. I would like to go to a few events to find out some more information. I’d like a list of upcoming events, that would be helpful. So, where do I start?

Google generic search

If searching for ScotRefEvents I would surely start with a Google search:  “Independence events in scotland 2017″ would seem like a reasonable search term. However, no list of relevent events is to be found. Links to the fantastic Independence Live and the equally magnificent Woman for Independence appear. Following the link to Independence Live’s Facebook page ends here:

A dead end in the search for upcoming events

The Woman for Independence link does show THEIR upcoming events, but of course this is far from a definitive list of events for the movement.

You won’t land in the right place with a general search term, so you have to get pretty specific to find an event on Google, and even when you do, you may not land on a live event.  A search on “events about a Scottish currency 2017” lead to an Eventbrite (more on Eventbrite below) page for an event that took place in Galashiels in March. Close, but no cigar.

So, here we are, no nearer to finding any future events (apart from the Woman for Indy: “Knit Your Own Pussy Hat”) To be honest, we can’t be too surprised at not finding individual events. The Search Engine Optimisation needed to drop a local event onto the first page of Google is beyond the reach of most indy groups, and paid for adverts on Google are a non starter.

As I noted above, we did find an event on Eventbrite, via our Google Search, so let’s look at that platform in detail.

Eventbrite

Eventbrite is the Facebook and Google for Events. It is effectively a micro search engine for events, or as Eventbrite calls them now, “experiences”.

Running your event on the platform that sits behind the world’s most popular search engine for events will increase the number of people who find it. Not only are people able to find your event directly via the platform, but your event is likely to rank higher with Google if it is on the Eventbrite platform. So, let’s take a look.

I used the search above and found the following events:

As you can see, it wasn’t long before Eventbrite suggested the totally irrelevant (second recommendation is way off!) but at least I found one live event that would, in our scenario, be of interest to that possible “Yes” voter, the CommonWeal event. But that’s it. One event.

So at this stage, I think it’s fair to ask the following question: As a movement are our events easy enough to find? Well, not so far,  so let’s have a look at finding our events via Twitter?

Twitter hashtag

Most people use hashtags to find specific areas / things of interest on Twitter. The most obvious #tag would be #ScotRefEvents but that leads to “no results”. Searching on “#ScotRef” leads to thousands of tweets. Using the search function for “scottish independence events” again leads us nowhere.

Unless you are following a specific Yes leaning organisation (and in our scenario this isn’t that likely), you aren’t going to see anything about their events. There is of course some chance of finding out about an event as people retweet information. But we can’t rely on that as a way for people to find our events. Twitter, at the moment, seems like another dead end. So let’s have a look at the most popular social network: Facebook.

Facebook

Last year Facebook really beefed up their events offering with EventMangerBlog suggesting that “Facebook Will Change Events Forever”, it is a platform that event organisers can’t ignore. For many of the grass roots events, Facebook is THE destination page for their events. So, surely, it should be easy for our No voter to find our events. But no, it’s the same old story:

ScotRefEvents
Dead End here as well.

I used two different search functions. The generic one and the event specific one. Searching on “Scotref Events” did, finally, return a live independence event! The GNW Scotref launch. I am sure this is a great event! But after such a long drawn out search our No voter would probably be too tired to attend.

So, searching via Google, Twitter, Eventbrite and Facebook our potential Yes voter found TWO future events. That’s it. TWO EVENTS. I know we can do better than that. There’s little point putting on an event if no one knows about it.

It is crucial that we engage as much as possible with those who seek information and engagement in a live environment.

For our movement we can’t do the field of dreams: “build it and they will come”, we have to think about how people find our events and we have to do all we can to help them find them. 

If you are interested in contributing to my work on a live engagement strategy for the YES movement please get in touch.

3 thoughts on “Searching for ScotRefEvents”

  1. There is also the http://www.yeslocal.info/ website, which has submitted events around Scotland. (although I don’t think I’ve seen results listed on Google).

    One thing that has to be remembered about using Google for example, as that it tailors search results based on your own previous searches, so that the results you receive on your browser will be different to what I see too.

    It is more likely that those that are moving to Yes, or are curious about #ScotRef won’t have conducted the same searches we will have done, so the set of results they see will probably be dominated (initially) by things such as BBC, Guardian & Facebook results.

    Having one website that shows as many events as possible is beneficial (like mine does) however that relies on people stumbling across it. The solution must be that as many pro-indy sites as possible show events to maximise the chances people see them. But rather than all of us hunting for events to show, we could instead take that information off one central site using a bit of scripting magic so everyone displays the same information.

    Here’s something I knocked up this morning to show what I mean: https://yes2hub.com/share/events.php

    This lists upcoming events (maximum of 10). I can create a couple of lines of javascript code that will allow anyone to place this somewhere on their website. (it can also be styled to fit in with their website template).

    I’ll do more work on it and release it for others to use should they want it.

    1. Dave, I’d happily place this on this website. Just to see how it goes. I can probably just about handle the technical aspect! Let me know next steps. I covered the issues the movement faces in this post and your comments seem like the basis for a post on some of the possible solutions. The yes local.info site looks interesting too.

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